Last edited by Kajiran
Tuesday, May 19, 2020 | History

2 edition of The effect of x-irradiation on the imprinting behaviour in the domestic chick. found in the catalog.

The effect of x-irradiation on the imprinting behaviour in the domestic chick.

Michael G. Strobal

The effect of x-irradiation on the imprinting behaviour in the domestic chick.

by Michael G. Strobal

  • 350 Want to read
  • 29 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (M.A.) - University of Toronto, 1964.

The Physical Object
Pagination1 v.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20099108M

The best-known form of imprinting is filial imprinting, in which a young animal acquires several of its behavioral characteristics from its is most obvious in nidifugous birds, which imprint on their parents and then follow them around. It was first reported in domestic chickens, by the 19th-century amateur biologist Douglas was rediscovered by the early ethologist Oskar. Define x-irradiation. x-irradiation synonyms, x-irradiation pronunciation, x-irradiation translation, English dictionary definition of x-irradiation. n. Exposure to x-ray radiation.

Patrick was a world authority on imprinting in birds — the process of learning to recognise their parents and members of their own species — and his work led to new principles in behavioural development. Bateson devised original experiments that showed how characteristics of imprinting depend on the bird's early life mater: University of Cambridge (BA, PhD). The Westermarck effect, also known as reverse sexual imprinting, is a psychological hypothesis that people who live in close domestic proximity during the first few years of their lives become desensitized to sexual hypothesis was first proposed by Finnish anthropologist Edvard Westermarck in his book The History of Human Marriage () as one explanation for the incest taboo.

In domestic chickens, the provision of maternal care strongly influences the behavioural development of chicks. Mother hens play an important role in directing their chicks’ behaviour and are able to buffer their chicks’ response to by: 7. Reverse sexual imprinting is also seen in instances where two people who live in domestic proximity during the first few years in the life of either one become desensitized to later close sexual phenomenon, known as the Westermarck effect, was first formally described by Finnish anthropologist Edvard Westermarck in his book The History of Human Marriage ().


Share this book
You might also like
Eisenhower and the American crusades

Eisenhower and the American crusades

The sonnets, triumphs, and other poems of Petrarch

The sonnets, triumphs, and other poems of Petrarch

Wedge and socket anchorages for wire ropes.

Wedge and socket anchorages for wire ropes.

The Hemingway reader.

The Hemingway reader.

Early prayer books of America

Early prayer books of America

The Magic of Violet

The Magic of Violet

Study Guide to Accompany Advanced Accounting Concepts and Practice, Fifth Edition

Study Guide to Accompany Advanced Accounting Concepts and Practice, Fifth Edition

Fort Smith, Ark.

Fort Smith, Ark.

The Crime of Guernica

The Crime of Guernica

Proceedings of 2004 IEEE Conference on Control Applications

Proceedings of 2004 IEEE Conference on Control Applications

cylinder wear in Diesel engines

cylinder wear in Diesel engines

life and letters of Samuel Palmer, painter and etcher

life and letters of Samuel Palmer, painter and etcher

New genera of two-winged flies of the subfamily Leptogastrinae of the family Asilidae.

New genera of two-winged flies of the subfamily Leptogastrinae of the family Asilidae.

Superfund Improvement Act of 1985

Superfund Improvement Act of 1985

Graphics hardware accelerated time-domain modeling of wireless channel geometries.

Graphics hardware accelerated time-domain modeling of wireless channel geometries.

The effect of x-irradiation on the imprinting behaviour in the domestic chick by Michael G. Strobal Download PDF EPUB FB2

The effect of food deprivation on runway performance was studied in two experiments using young domestic chicks as Ss. Andrew, R. J.,Specific short-term latency effects of oestradiol and testosterone on distractability and memory formation in the young domestic chick, in: “Hormones and Behaviour in higher vertebrates, J.

Balthazart, E. Prove and R. Gilles, eds., Springer, Berlin. Google ScholarCited by: 5. This chapter discusses the relationship between perceptual development and social attachment by exploring the effects of premature visual experience on the imprinting responses of domestic chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus) through a laboratory experiment.

When chicks are exposed to a moving object for a limited period, the proportion that develop a preference for the object initially increases Author: Wendy L.

Hill. 13 Filial imprinting and sexual imprinting have certain things in common even though sexual imprinting takes place later in development than filial imprinting. 11 Both filial and sexual imprinting have evolved to enable birds to recognise their close kin, but the necessity for kin recognition is different in young and adult.

The young bird needs to discriminate between the parent that cares for it and Author: Patrick Bateson. Abstract. It is not perhaps surprising that there is a long history of interest in the mechanisms by which information is stored in the brain.

Superficially, the explanations that have been offered have varied down the centuries, but with few exceptions the explanations share a common theme: a particular experience or event leads to the formation or strengthening of pathways in the by: 2. AbstractYoung precocial birds develop a preference for an imprinting object.

In the domestic chick, several behavioral phenomena meet these conditions, including the learning processes of filial imprinting and passive avoidance learning. Imprinting provides a striking example of the way in which a particular experience has a specific effect only when the animal is at a certain stage of behavioural development.

Indeed, the regulation of imprinting predisposes many species of bird to learn the characteristics of their parent at what would appear to be the biologically appropriate time in their life cycles. FILIAL IMPRINTING is the phenomenon exhibited when the newborn of a species follows and becomes bonded to the first moving object they encounter.

[1] Imprinting is an example of how some animals are genetically hard-wired to quickly learn. Imprinting and Attachment in Biology. It is a good example of how behaviour gives the appearance of being well designed to serve the needs of the young birds. The relations between filial and sexual imprinting in the domestic fowl: Effects of age and social experience.

The difference between imprinting and song learning lies in the consequences of observational learning. The effect of imprinting is the formation of various forms of social attachment. But what mechanism causes the young chick or duckling to follow its mother.

Lorenz thought that imprinting was unrewarded, yet the tendency of a youngFile Size: 20KB. Adjusting parental investment to changing environmental conditions: the effect of food ration on parental behaviour of the convict cichlid, Cichlasoma nigrofasciatum.

Imprinting, which can be studied in the domestic chick (Gallus gallus domesticus), is an instance of a general form of learning in which subjects become familiar with a stimulus as a result of Cited by: In domestic chickens, the provision of maternal care strongly influences the behavioural development of chicks.

Mother hens play an important role in directing their chicks’ behaviour and are able to buffer their chicks’ response to stressors. Chicks imprint upon their mother, who is key in directing the chicks’ behaviour and in allowing them to develop food by: 7.

It is evident that poultry biology and behavior must be taken fully into account in the design and management of systems, and in the production and overcoming of problems. This book considers the ways in which the biology and behavior of the birds concerned influences the performance of different systems and are in turn influenced by the environment.

Full text Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version. Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (M), or click on a page image below to browse page by by:   The behaviour observed was classified into Fear, Exploration, Sex, Aggression, and Indifference and the behaviour patterns in each category have been described.

When confronted with a prone hand Fear was least in Expt 3. When confronted with a dead chick or a live chick similar to themselves Fear was least in Expt by: This book reviews research on the development of brain and behaviour in the chick and juxtaposes this with similar work on other avian and, to a lesser extent, mammalian species.

It begins by outlining the developmental stages of the chick embryo, including the effects of environmental stimulation. Effects of radiation on the behavior of animals: A review of the literature [J. L Preston] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The aim of the study was to assess the behaviour of chicks of three different breeds of laying hens differing in the activity, emotional reactivity, and environmental preferences.

Another objective was to answer the question whether the behavioural differences between adult birds would be evident already in the chick period or whether they are an effect of the further modifying impact of the Author: Iwona Rozempolska-Rucińska, Kornel Kasperek, Kamil Drabik, Grzegorz Zięba, Agnieszka Ziemiańska.

Filial imprinting. The best-known form of imprinting is filial imprinting, in which a young animal narrows its social preferences to an object (typically a parent) as a result of exposure to that object.

It is most obvious in nidifugous birds, which imprint on their parents and then follow them around.Integrating ideas and findings from a range of disciplines, this book provides a common framework for understanding diverse issues in behavior studies.

The framework is derived from classical ethology, incorporating concepts and data from research in experimental psychology, neurophysiology and evolutionary by: 5.

Chick, gosling, poult, keet, cygnet, or duckling imprinting is the quickest way for nature to ensure that newly-hatched poultry stick with their parent. Despite the protection we provide on the farm, poultry parents and young still retain these instincts.